Author Archives: Linda Ziedrich

About Linda Ziedrich

I grow, cook, preserve, and write about food in Oregon's Willamette Valley.

Now Aboard the Ark: Scio Kolace

New to Slow Food’s Ark of Taste is kolace (pronounced “ko-LA-chee”) from Scio, Oregon, my home for 21 years. I’m proud to have nominated this filled sweet yeast bread whose history is so tightly bound with that of the little … Continue reading

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The New Fruit Cellar

  In case you’ve been wondering why I haven’t written in so long, I’ll explain: We’ve been moving. This has involved renovating a little old bungalow, cleaning out a big house, a two-story garage, and a large barn, selling or … Continue reading

Posted in Fruits, Pickles, Sweet preserves | Tagged , , , | 14 Comments

The Bambi Wars Continue

My latest weapon in the war against the deer is kimchi. The dryer sheets repelled them only briefly last summer, and the creatures are apparently starting to savor the scent of rotten egg. Rotten egg presents other problems, too: It … Continue reading

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Long Red Radishes from Italy, Angelica for the Bugs, and Roses for Preserves

I should have photographed these before they started to bolt, but they’re still lovely, aren’t they? The variety is Ravanello Candela di Fuoco, and the seeds were a gift from Charlene Murdock and Richard White of Nana Cardoon. Before the … Continue reading

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Shrub, Part II: Quince Vinegar, Syrup, and Shrub

The various historical meanings of shrub have always fallen into two groups, the syrup, or pre-mix, and the finished drink. I’ve often made shrub as a finished drink but seldom as a pre-mix, because it makes more sense, to me, … Continue reading

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Shrub, Part I: The Story of a Drink

Is there any living man who now calls for shrub? You may still see it on the shelf of an old-fashioned inn; you may even see the announcement that it is for sale painted on door-posts, but no man regardeth … Continue reading

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Name the Mystery Melon

Do you recognize this melon? I found one like it at a Vietnamese market in Portland in 2013, saved the seeds, and planted them in 2014. The vines were vigorous and healthy, and the fruits oblong and fairly large, with … Continue reading

Posted in Fruits | Tagged , , | 11 Comments

Olive-Oil Pickles: Q&A

Before the routine use of mason jars or even paraffin in the home kitchen, olive oil was often used, in America as well as Europe, to seal air out of jars of vinegar-pickled vegetables. When you’re canning pickles in the … Continue reading

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Forget the Roots: Radishes for Spicy Sprouts

These are red-stemmed kaiware, radish sprouts, growing in one of my raised beds last September. I thank Judy Gregory for sending me the seeds. She got them from Kitazawa Seed Co., of Oakland, which has been selling Asian seeds in … Continue reading

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Another Fine Use for Parsnips

Danita’s story about parsnips in her Grandma’s stew made me curious: What about parsnips would turn off a child? Danita remembered the parsnips as bitter. Did the cooking method make them this way, or did it bring out a bitterness … Continue reading

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